Improving the Management of Sclerotinia Stem Rot of Canola Using Fungicides and Better Risk Assessment Tools

Priorities
Agronomy Research  Diseases 
Start Date
2018
End Date
2023
Principal Investigator
Thomas Kelly Turkington - Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (Lacombe)
Co-Investigators
Stephen Strelkov - University of Alberta, Michael Harding - Alberta Agriculture and Forestry, Henry Klein-Gebbinck - Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (Beaverlodge), Breanne Tideman - Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (Lacombe), Greg Semach - Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (Beaverlodge), Charles Geddes - Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (Lethbridge), Henry de Gooijer - Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (Indian Head), Gary Peng - Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (Saskatoon), William May - Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (Indian Head), Dale Tomasiewicz - Canada-Saskatchewan Irrigation Diversification Centre, Ramona Mohr - Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (Brandon), Debbie McLaren - Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (Brandon), Denis Pageau - Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (Quebec), Barb Ziesman - Ministry of Agriculture (Saskatchewan), Syama Chatterton - Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (Lethbridge)
MCGA Funding
$13,409
Total Project Funding
$985,800
External Funding Partners
Alberta Canola, SaskCanola, Canola Council of Canada, Canadian Agricultural Partnership
Report
Project Ongoing...

Research Objective

  • Study factors that influence inoculum assessment of stem rot
  • Interpret the more accurate inoculum levels to understand the most efficient use of fungicide applications

Project Description

Stem rot can be hard to quantify in canola crops because weather conditions and canopy development affects measured inoculum levels and thus prediction models. This study proposes to help with the assessment of inoculum levels and how weather affects stem rot to have more effective fungicide applications. Also, to study how seeding rates affect canopy development and fungicide penetration/coverage to help management practices. Farmers and industry will benefit directly from the proposed research since it will improve their ability to assess the risk of sclerotinia stem rot and need for fungicide application, while allowing them to get the most out of the fungicides based on risk, crop development, and improved canopy coverage.

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